Plenary Speaker

Short CV
Prof. Dr. Sandra Van Aert received her PhD at the Delft University of Technology (The Netherlands) in 2003 and has been professor at the University of Antwerp since 2009. Her research focuses on new developments in the field of model-based electron microscopy using statistical parameter estimation theory. This enables one to measure unknown structure parameters with high accuracy and precision from electron microscopy signals. In this manner, all information contained in an atomic resolution image can be assessed quantitatively. This method for analysing experimental images allows one to measure 2D atomic column positions with subpicometer precision, to measure compositional changes at interfaces, to count atoms in an atomic column with single atom sensitivity, to unscramble mixtures of elements, and to reconstruct 3D structures with atomic resolution. In 2017, she received the prestigious Ernst Ruska Prize awarded by the German Electron Microscopy Society. In 2018, she was awarded an ERC Consolidator Grant PICOMETRICS.

Title of Talk
Novel approaches to investigate the 3D atomic structure of nanomaterials and their dynamics from STEM images using statistical parameter estimation and deep convolutional neural networks

Short CV
Sarah Haigh is a Professor of Materials Characterisation at the University of Manchester, United Kingdom. She is the Director of bp-International Centre for Advanced Materials (ICAM) and leads projects applying electron microscopy methods for advancing green catalysis. She is Director of the Department of Materials Electron Microscopy Centre, which has 25 instruments and over 500 users. Her research group is centred around improving our understanding of 2D materials and nanoparticle performance using advanced transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging and analysis techniques. Her group are developing in-situ TEM methodologies and she holds an ERC Starter Grant in this area (EvoluTEM). She has published 4 book chapters, over 200 papers, with >10000 citations since 2016 and has an H-index of 48. Before moving to The University of Manchester in 2010 she worked as consultant application specialist to JEOL UK, and earlier completed MEng and DPhil degrees in Material Science at the University of Oxford. She is a Liveryman of the Armourers and Brasiers Company and sits on their Material Science Committee. She won the IOM3 Silver Medal in 2017 and an RMS Innovation Award in 2018

Title of Talk
Atomic insights from 2D material heterostructures and the application of heterostructures to in situ TEM imaging

Short CV
Stefan Raunser is a structural biologist whose research focuses on understanding molecular mechanisms underlying cellular processes in the healthy and diseased organism. He is director of the Department of Structural Biochemistry at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Adjunct Professor at Technical University Dortmund and Honorary Professor at University of Duisburg-Essen. With his research group, he uses a multi-disciplinary approach, including biochemical reconstitutions, high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) and electron cryotomography (cryo-ET) primarily to investigate the structure of macromolecular complexes that play a crucial role in cell physiology, with a particular emphasis on toxin-mediated membrane permeation, the molecular details of muscle contraction and the dynamics of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. A detailed understanding of these processes is of great importance as they ultimately serve to develop pharmaceutical measures to combat disease.

He has authored over 100 papers in the fields of structural and molecular biology and has given over 200 lectures and seminars around the world. He is a scientific member of the Max Planck Society and an elected member of the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina and EMBO. 

Title of Talk
A streamlined cryo-ET workflow to obtain sarcomere structures at molecular resolution
 

Short CV
Prof. Andreas Rosenauer has been leading the Electron Microscopy group at the Solid State Physics Institute of the University of Bremen since 2004. After his habilitation in Karlsruhe in 2001 he was guest professor and then ordinary professor at the EMAT Research Centre in Antwerp. His work group focuses on development and application of quantitative methods in transmission electron microscopy. He started with measurement of strain by DALI (digital analysis of lattice images), developed the CELFA (composition evaluation by lattice fringe analysis) method and then turned towards quantitative STEM. Together with his group, he developed the STEMsim programme, which for instance was applied to analysis of composition based on comparison of experimental STEM intensity with simulation. His current research interests include a quantitative understanding of momentum resolved STEM and its application to measurement of atomic electric fields and charge density as well as polarisation induced electric fields in semiconductor heterostructures. He also developed the ISTEM (imaging STEM) method, which improves the resolution of TEM imaging.

Title of Talk
Understanding quantitative STEM: How far have we come?

Short CV
Marc Willinger studied physics at the Technical University in Vienna and obtained his PhD at the Technical University in Berlin for the investigation of the electronic structure of vanadium phosphorous oxides. After a Post Doc at the Department of Inorganic Chemistry of the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society in Berlin, he moved to the University of Aveiro in Portugal, where he had a position as an independent researcher for 4 years. In 2010, he was offered a group leader position at the Fritz Haber Institute, where he started to develop and implement tools for multi-scale in situ and operando electron microscopy. In 2015, he took over the lead of a second electron microscopy group at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces. In 2018, he accepted a new position at the Scientific Centre of Optical and Electron Microscopy (ScopeM) at the ETH in Zurich, where he is responsible for TEM in material science and the development and implementation of in situ techniques.

Marc Willinger is interested in the relation between structure/composition and the resulting physical/chemical properties of materials, especially the emergence of synergistic effects, pattern formation and catalytic activity.

Title of Talk
Applications of environmental SEM as in situ surface-science tool with atomic layer sensitivity